DIAMOND Education

Diamond Shapes

Diamonds come in many different shapes. Each diamond shape possesses its own unique qualities, so exploring and learning about the various shapes is worth your while. Aksaja Diamond offers the highest quality certified diamonds to satisfy all tastes.

Asscher Cut Diamonds

The Asscher Cut Diamond, also called a "Square Emerald-Cut", is made using a step-cut process and has cropped corners. Because of the cropped corners, an Asscher Cut Diamond appears almost octagonal at first glance. They are bright, shiny, and clear in appearance. Like Emerald-Cut Diamonds, they have the clarity of glacier-water ice, allowing you to see all the way through the stone. However, since inclusions are obvious to the naked eye with Asscher Cut Diamonds, it is important to get one that is flawless or as close to flawless as possible.

Brilliant Cut Diamonds

The Round Diamond, or Brilliant Cut Diamond, is by far the most popular shape for diamond engagement rings. It is cone-shaped to maximize light return through the top of the diamond. It is cut to have 58 facets: 33 on the crown and 25 on the pavilion. The relationship between the angle of the crown (above the girdle) and the pavilion (below the girdle) is complementary. A steep crown angle is complemented by a shallower pavilion angle, and vice versa.

Cushion Cut Diamonds

The Cushion Cut Diamond is an antique cut that has a classic, romantic appeal. It is considered a cross between the Old Mine Cut, which was popular in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and a modern Oval-Cut Diamond. The Old Mine Cut featured large facets and rounded corners, since the cutting was all done by hand at the time. They were designed to catch the beauty of candlelight. The Cushion-Cut Diamond contains 58 facets.

Emerald Cut Diamonds

The Emerald-Cut Diamond is a very popular style known for its beauty and precision. While it lacks the brilliance of diamonds cut with triangular and kite-shaped facets, it more than makes up for it in its extreme clarity – it’s like looking into glacier-pure ice. The Emerald-Cut diamond is named so because this style of cut was originally used only on emeralds. It is called a step-cut, which is the cut most commonly used on square or rectangular diamonds.

Heart Diamonds

The Heart Shaped Diamond has a cleft at the top and exhibits superior brilliance. It is among the most romantic of the diamond shapes. When selecting a heart shaped diamond, symmetry is essential, as the two halves of the heart must be identical. The split between the two lobes should be obvious and sharp, and the wings should have a round shape. Generally, heart shapes diamonds of less than .50 carats are not a good choice. As opposed to other diamond shapes, they appear smaller, especially after set in prongs. Bezel and three prong settings are best for small heart shaped diamonds.

Marquise Diamonds

The Marquise-Cut Diamond is a boat-shaped brilliant stone that is considered to be a "classic" shape for diamond engagement rings. As with all 'fancy cut' diamonds, color and clarity are the two most important qualities in this particular style of cut. The Marquise-Cut Diamond uses a cutting process similar to that of a Round Brilliant Diamond, but the diamond cutter maximizes the carat weight of the gem by elongating it into its distinctive ''boat-shape''. This way, they can eliminate all inclusions while maintaining as much of the unblemished stone as possible. However, because of the elongated shape, color and clarity imperfections are more obvious than they are in a traditional Round Brilliant Diamonds

Oval Diamonds

The Oval Cut Diamond is a modified version of the most popular cut, the Round Brilliant. It is the perfect choice for buyers who are looking for characteristics similar to the Round "Ideal" Cut, but would like something in a shape that is more unusual. Oval Cut diamonds also create the optical illusion of length and serve to elegantly elongate fingers.

Pear Diamonds

The Pear Shaped Diamond combines the tradition and brilliance of a round cut with a less common shape to create an unusual diamond that can still make light 'dance' as it does in the traditional Round Brilliant Cut. It is probably the most subjective diamond shape, as its size and proportions are really a matter of taste. The diamond usually contains 58 facets, allowing for light to pass through it much the same way as in a Round, but makes more of an impression because of its much less common shape.

Princess Cut Diamonds

The Princess cut diamonds can make the perfect engagement rings since they are very clear. Their exquisite shape makes them an exotic treasure, as they are designed for getting top brilliance from their square cut. When purchasing a Princess Cut diamond, make sure that the setting for your ring protects the four pointed corners. The Princess Cut diamond allows more acceptably for flaws.

Radiant Cut Diamonds

The Radiant Cut Diamond combines the more stylish square or rectangular shape with the brilliance of the more traditional Round Cut. It combines two diamond cutting styles-the Round Cut style and the Emerald Cut style, to create a non-traditional, yet still brilliant, diamond. This cut, created in 1977 by Henry Grossbard, was designed to maintain the beauty of each different type of diamond, while still creating something altogether different from anything available at the time.

Diamond Anatomy

While every diamond is unique, all diamonds share certain structural features. A diamond’s anatomy, or its basic structure, determines its proportions, brilliance, dispersion and scintillation. Each part of the diamond has a specific name, and having a basic understanding of how each part contributes to the diamond as a whole will help you find your perfect diamond.
A diamond is comprised of the eight main components. They are Diameter, Table, Crown, Table Spread, Girdle, Pavilion, Depth, and Culet. Below is a brief description of each part of a diamond and its location.

  • Diameter:

    The width of a polished stone, measured from edge to edge.

  • Table:

    The largest polished facet located on the top of the diamond.

  • Crown:

    The top part of a diamond extending from the table to the girdle. The crown is made up of bezel facets (crown mains), star facets, upper girdle facets (upper halves), and a table facet.

  • Girdle:

    The very edge (widest edge) of the diamond where the crown and pavilion meet.

  • Pavilion:

    The bottom part of a diamond extending from the girdle down to the culet.

  • Depth:

    The total height of a diamond measured from the table to the culet.

  • Culet:

    The small or pointed facet at the very bottom of the diamond.

Before purchasing a diamond, make sure that you have a basic understanding of a diamond’s anatomy. This will allow you to truly appreciate diamonds and all their intricacies, communicate with experts about a particular diamond, and, most importantly, it will assist you in making a well-thought out decision about which diamond is best for you.

Proportion – Understanding Brilliance, Dispersion & Scintillation

Well–proportioned diamonds exhibit three different properties: brilliance, dispersion and scintillation. As light strikes a diamond's surface, it will either reflect off the table of a polished stone or enter the diamond. The light that is reflected is known as the diamond's brilliance — the flash of white light one sees when looking at a stone. As light travels through a stone, some of the light rays are separated into flashes of color. This is known as dispersion. The result of dispersion—the separation of white light into its spectral colors — is known as fire. Scintillation is flashes of color that are viewable as an observer moves a diamond back and forth.

Putting It All Together

Use this interactive tool to see how depth and table percentages can affect the brilliance in a round diamond. Please Note: this example is for a round diamond only—fancy shapes have their own set of unique properties.

Diamond Symmetry

Symmetry refers to the exactness of the shape and arrangement of facets in a diamond. Although to the naked eye finish features only have a tiny effect on appearance, symmetry is significant. In diamonds that have low clarity grades, symmetry is less important, but in diamonds with very high clarity grades, symmetry is very important.

Wavy Girdle

The girdle of a diamond should be a flat plane, parallel to the table. In this example the girdle "waves" as it wraps around the diamond.

Crown & Pavilion Misalignment

In a round diamond the top points of the pavilion mains and the bottom points of the bezel facets should meet precisely at the girdle. We can see in this example the diamond's crown and pavilion facets are misaligned.

Extra Facets

These are typically located on the pavilion, near the girdle, but they can be found anywhere on a diamond. In this example we see where extra facets commonly occur.

Off-Center Culet

To check if the culet is centered, look at the diamond in the face-up position. You'll see the lower girdle facets through the table. If the lines formed by them look like a perfect square, the culet is centered. If the cross bends one way of the other, the culet is not centered. In this example we see what an off-centered culet might look like. Off-Center Table

Off-Center Culet

To check if the culet is centered, look at the diamond in the face-up position. You'll see the lower girdle facets through the table. If the lines formed by them look like a perfect square, the culet is centered. If the cross bends one way of the other, the culet is not centered. In this example we see what an off-centered culet might look like.

Off-Center Table

The placement of the table (the largest facet on a diamond) should be centered at the top of the stone and needs to be parallel to the girdle. If the table is off-center or not parallel with the girdle this can cause uneven crown angles from one side to the other. In this example we see the unbalanced appearance that occurs from an off-center table.

Table & Girdle Not Parallel

Here we see another example of what occurs when the table is not parallel with the girdle. As you see, the crown angle is much steeper on one-side than the other. From the top view you may have noticed an off-center table.

Misshapen Face

Here we see another example of what occurs when the table is not parallel with the girdle. As you see, the crown angle is much steeper on one-side than the other. From the top view you may have noticed an off-center table.

Faces Not Pointing Up

Some diamonds display facets that are not properly pointed. Facet patterns of round brilliants are meant to show a precise arrangement of 58 perfectly shaped facets. In this example we see some that some do not meet at a direct point.

Faces Not Pointing Up

A natural is the original "rough" of the diamond. Naturals always occur or start out on the girdle. They either dip towards the pavilion or the crown. In this example we see the natural located on the girdle running down into the pavilion.

Diamond Polish

What Is Diamond Polish?

Diamond polish influences how well light is able to pass through a diamond. It is a very important attribute in determining a diamond's overall brilliance. When choosing a diamond, it is best to pick one that is laboratory certified with good, very good or excellent polish. Diamonds with poor polish are significantly less brilliant because they have microscopic polish lines that blur the surface of the stone—this also reduces the amount of light that enters or exits the diamond. Be aware that many diamonds have a poor polish because some diamond cutters reduce their costs by not spending sufficient time to properly polish a diamond.

How Is Polish Graded?

Polish is graded the same that way symmetry is graded. On a GIA report, the grades are Excellent, Very Good, Good, Fair or Poor. The same applies for AGS and IGI reports, which also include ideal in their list.

  • EX or E - Excellent, Flawless at 10X magnification
  • VG or VGD - Very Good, Extremely difficult to locate under 10X magnification
  • GD, GO, G - Good, Very difficult to see under 10X magnification
  • F, FR, FA - Fair, Noticeable under 10X magnification
  • PR, PO, P - Poor, Easy to see under 10X magnification / Visible to unaided eye
  • VP, VE - Very Poor, Relatively easy to see with the unaided eyeVP, VE - Very Poor, Relatively easy to see with the unaided eye
  • EX or EP - Extremely Poor, Obvious to see with unaided eye

There is very little difference between these ratings to the unaided eye. A diamond with a polish rating of Good can still be a remarkable stone. It is only under magnification that the differences in these ratings become clearer. Polish rated Fair (FR) and Poor (PR), however, indicates that the flaws in the polish are visible to the naked eye and affect the overall beauty of the diamond.

It is also important that your ring does not have a porosity problem or rough spots in the metal. Porosity is when there are little surface holes that get worse as you go deeper into the metal. Generally the result of mass producing rings with poor quality control, porosity makes a ring weak and is non-repairable. A ring with porosity will eventually break down.

Fluorescence

What Is Diamond Fluorescence?

Fluorescence is a naturally occurring phenomenon that appears in certain minerals and gems. Some quality diamonds display a visible light when they are exposed to ultraviolet light. This light is known as fluorescence. Under most lighting conditions, a diamond's fluorescence is not visible to the naked eye, although the diamond will exhibit a soft colored glow if held under an ultraviolet lamp.

Do All Diamond Fluoresce?

Not all diamond fluoresce. If a specific diamond does not fluoresce, the grading report will list the diamond's fluorescence as either inert or none.

What Are The Different Types of Diamond Fluorescence?

The degree of fluorescence varies from faint to medium to strong to very strong. Faint means that the stone has a slight glow that is difficult to see under ultraviolet light. Very strong means that the diamond emits a deep glow that is very clear under ultraviolet light. The color of the fluorescence can also vary, although blue is the most common color. Yellow, green and white are other colors that a fluorescent diamond may exhibit.

How Does Fluorescence Affect A Diamond?

Fluorescence usually has no effect on a diamond's appearance in regular lighting conditions. In some cases, however, a strong blue fluorescence can make a yellow colored diamond appear whiter. In rare cases, it can or cause a stone to appear milky or oily.

Ideal Cut Diamonds

An ideal cut diamond is a round, brilliant, or princess cut diamond that is cut to ideal proportions and angles and has excellent polish and symmetry ratings. An ideal cut diamond reflects almost all the light that enters it, and is among the rarest cuts. The ideal cut diamond is used as benchmark for grading all other diamonds. In America, ideal cut proportions are often determined by the American Gem Society Laboratory (AGSL), but different countries and different companies base their idea of the ideal cut on different standards.

Back in the 1900s, Belgian diamond cutter, Marcel Tolkowsky, coined the term- Ideal Cut. After analyzing the round brilliant cut diamond, he took both brilliance (the amount of the white light reflected) and fire (the separation of white light into its spectral colors) into consideration. While his calculations serve as a guide for today's idea of the global "ideal cut" standards, countries have still made their own modifications.

Tolkowsky's ideal cut is not perfect, but it nevertheless serves as a basic guideline for ideal cut diamonds. Today, we also use the guidelines of a gemstone cutter named Bruce Harding who developed another model in the 1970s as well as other computer models and technological scopes.

Ideal diamonds are perfectly proportioned to refract light, producing that fire and brilliance up through to the table and crown. There are at least six "ideal cuts" being used today but only three of them (including the one by Tolkowsky) are the most common. Aksaja Diamond, the premier diamond retailer, offers four cuts of diamonds, two of which are ideal. A Hearts diamond is a type of ideal cut diamond.

Hearts and Arrows

Our Hearts and Arrows collection is the ultimate expression of love - that's why we call these masterpiece, a perfect diamond.

Hearts & Arrows Visual Pattern

Seen from above, a Hearts and Arrows diamond shows an arrow pattern. When displayed on its pavilion side, the diamond presents the eye with 8 hearts with tiny 'v' shapes. Genuine Hearts and Arrows have these patterns visible at a single glance, indicating that the diamond has perfect optical symmetry. Aksaja Diamond provides actual photographs of all our diamonds - so you can see their inherent perfection with your very own eyes.

Hearts and Arrow Ideal Cut Diamonds

Every diamond in our collection is an ideal cut diamond, with superb color, dazzling clarity, incomparable symmetry and exquisite shape. They are the perfect marriage between brilliance and beauty, elegance and grace.

A Hearts and Arrows By Any Other Name...

Hearts and Arrows diamonds are sold under many names. Hearts on Fire and Leo Diamonds are but two examples. Aksaja Diamond takes pride in presenting only the finest Hearts and Arrows diamonds money can buy - every single diamond we sell is cut and polished at 100X magnification.

Hearts and Arrows shine as bright as a star and complement the beauty in her eyes. Give her what she deserves. Give her the most perfect of diamonds. Give her a Aksaja Diamond TrueHeartsTM.

What is a Diamond Certificate?

A diamond certificate verifies each diamond’s specifications, including its color grade, carat weight, clarity grade and cut grade. You should never buy a diamond without a diamond certificate. The most well-known grading laboratories are the Gemological Institute of America (GIA) and the American Gem Society (AGS) and the International Gemological Institute (IGI).

A diamond's cost depends upon objective characteristics popularly known as the 4C's: Color, Clarity, Cut and Carat. The relationship between these four characteristics determines the value of a diamond. Although it is commonly assumed that carat is the most important member of the 4C's, color, cut and clarity have a much greater impact on the appearance of a diamond.

What is a Diamond Certificate?

A diamond certificate verifies each diamond’s specifications, including its color grade, carat weight, clarity grade and cut grade. You should never buy a diamond without a diamond certificate. The most well-known grading laboratories are the Gemological Institute of America (GIA) and the American Gem Society (AGS) and the International Gemological Institute (IGI).

A diamond's cost depends upon objective characteristics popularly known as the 4C's: Color, Clarity, Cut and Carat. The relationship between these four characteristics determines the value of a diamond. Although it is commonly assumed that carat is the most important member of the 4C's, color, cut and clarity have a much greater impact on the appearance of a diamond.

What is a Diamond Certificate?

A diamond certificate verifies each diamond’s specifications, including its color grade, carat weight, clarity grade and cut grade. You should never buy a diamond without a diamond certificate. The most well-known grading laboratories are the Gemological Institute of America (GIA) and the American Gem Society (AGS) and the International Gemological Institute (IGI).

A diamond's cost depends upon objective characteristics popularly known as the 4C's: Color, Clarity, Cut and Carat. The relationship between these four characteristics determines the value of a diamond. Although it is commonly assumed that carat is the most important member of the 4C's, color, cut and clarity have a much greater impact on the appearance of a diamond.

What is a Diamond Certificate?

A diamond certificate verifies each diamond’s specifications, including its color grade, carat weight, clarity grade and cut grade. You should never buy a diamond without a diamond certificate. The most well-known grading laboratories are the Gemological Institute of America (GIA) and the American Gem Society (AGS) and the International Gemological Institute (IGI).

A diamond's cost depends upon objective characteristics popularly known as the 4C's: Color, Clarity, Cut and Carat. The relationship between these four characteristics determines the value of a diamond. Although it is commonly assumed that carat is the most important member of the 4C's, color, cut and clarity have a much greater impact on the appearance of a diamond.

What is a Diamond Certificate?

A diamond certificate verifies each diamond’s specifications, including its color grade, carat weight, clarity grade and cut grade. You should never buy a diamond without a diamond certificate. The most well-known grading laboratories are the Gemological Institute of America (GIA) and the American Gem Society (AGS) and the International Gemological Institute (IGI).

A diamond's cost depends upon objective characteristics popularly known as the 4C's: Color, Clarity, Cut and Carat. The relationship between these four characteristics determines the value of a diamond. Although it is commonly assumed that carat is the most important member of the 4C's, color, cut and clarity have a much greater impact on the appearance of a diamond.

Why is a Grading Certificate Not Enough?

Take a look at the diamonds below. Both diamonds are 1.01 Carat H-SI2 Excellent Cut Round Diamonds. Based on price and certificate alone, these diamonds appear nearly identical. However, using our exclusive Diamond, you can tell just how different these two diamonds are!

First, let’s look at the diamonds’ certificates:

  • 1.01 Carat H-SI2 Excellent Cut Round Diamond

  • 1.01 Carat H-SI2 Excellent Cut Round Diamond

Based on certificate alone, which one would you choose?

Now, take a look at the actual diamonds:

  • 1.01 Carat H-SI2 Excellent Cut Round Diamond

    Based on these actual diamond images, which diamond would you choose?

    The diamond on the bottom (B) is eye-clean, the diamond on the top (A) is clearly not eye clean. That’s the power of seeing actual diamonds!

    If you have any questions about a particular diamond, feel free to contact us. We have highly trained gemologists on staff available to assist you 24/7.

Conflict-Free Diamonds - Our Guarantee

At Aksaja Diamond, we understand that our customers care where their diamonds come from and we share that concern with you. Every diamond we sell is certified conflict-free, assuring you that our inventory was procured through legal sources. In compliance with the Patriot Act, the Kimberley Process, and various United Nations resolutions, the diamonds we sell have been obtained using legitimate means. Further, our internal guidelines exceed government requirements: we have binding contracts with our suppliers which guarantee that the diamonds they offer to us for sale are conflict-free. We do not purchase polished diamonds from sources which are not members of the professional diamond trade.

Blood Diamonds - Financing Death and Environmental Destruction

Conflict-free diamonds are those gems which were not obtained in association with human rights abuses, child labor, violence, or environmental degradation. Although the United Nation’s Kimberley Process only covers diamonds under the control of legitimate and recognized governments, conflict-free goes one step further by rejecting diamonds from governments that trade in diamonds to bankroll their conflicts. Throughout the 1990s, most of the world's diamonds came from Africa, particularly regions undergoing civil unrest. Rebel armies in parts of Africa were exploiting alluvial diamond fields to fund their wars against established governments, putting people and the environment in the middle of their conflicts. Alluvial diamonds are found just inches to a few feet below the surface, making them easier to mine, but having an adverse impact on the environment. The people working these fields were often very young and subject to exploitation, with some losing their lives or becoming permanently maimed as wars raged around them. Hence, the term blood diamonds came into being to describe these types of gems.

Kimberley Compliant and America's Patriot Act

The Kimberley Process Certification Scheme (KPCS) was established to certify the origin of rough diamonds from sources known to be conflict-free. A 2000 meeting of southern African diamond producing countries established guidelines for the KPCS, which were later adopted by the United Nations. To ensure compliance, independent auditing systems are tasked with tracking diamonds from their place of origin to delivery. Polished diamonds sold in the U.S. must adhere to the Patriot Act which requires that every U.S. dealer maintain Kimberley compliance or be subject to penalties from Homeland Security, the U.S. Justice Department, and the U.S. Treasury.

eye clean diamond

Eye Clean Diamonds

What Are Eye Clean Diamonds?

Aksaja Diamond considers a diamond eye clean if the diamond appears to be free of inclusions when viewed face up in daylight (or fluorescent lighting) by the naked eye (with 20/20 vision) from a relatively short distance (6-12 inches).

The concept of an eye clean diamond varies slightly in definition from retailer to retailer, but three major factors influence the definition of eye clean diamonds:

  1. Distance and point of reference
  2. The lighting under which the diamond is evaluated
  3. The vision of the viewer

According to GIA and AGS, diamonds that are considered Flawless (FL), Internally Flawless (IF), Very, Very Slightly Included (VVS1 and VVS2) and Very Slightly Included (VS1 and VS2) are considered eye clean.

On the other hand, Slightly Included (SI1 and SI2) diamonds may or may not be eye clean. They need to be assessed individually to see if they are a good value.

Included (I1, I2 and I3) diamonds are considered non eye clean.

How to Choose the Perfect Diamond

When looking to buy a wedding or engagement ring, it is important that you know how to choose the perfect diamond. While some people prefer gemstone or rough diamonds, classic diamonds are still the most popular stone on the market and so it is essential that you understand everything you can about them. When searching for the perfect diamond*, there are four categories (or characteristics) to consider.

The 4 C's:

Cut - Describes the finish, proportion and polish of the diamond. These factors determine the fire and brilliance of a diamond.

An Ideal Cut diamond is a round (also known as brilliant) or princess cut diamond that is cut to ideal proportions and angles and has excellent polish and symmetry ratings.

A Hearts diamond is a round or princess cut diamond that exhibits a near flawless Hearts and Arrows pattern of perfect optical symmetry, maximizing the diamond’s fire, brilliance and light dispersion.

Clarity - Describes the clearness or purity of a diamond. A grade is assigned to each diamond, with "F" representing a flawless diamond to "I" describing a diamond that has inclusions. Most diamonds can be found at various grades between “F� and “I.� Diamond buyers will sometimes choose a gem with some inclusions, as long as they are not visible to the naked eye.

Color - From white to yellow, diamonds receive a grade for the amount of color they contain. Diamond buyers prefer colorless to near colorless diamonds, with diamonds graded J, K, and L offering the best value for a customer’s money.

Carat - Carat refers to the weight of the diamond. One carat is equivalent to 0.20 grams. The larger the carat, the pricier the diamond, although the other "C's" can influence the final price significantly.

Though not mentioned as one of the four C's, a diamond's shape plays an integral part in the selection of any diamond engagement ring. Aksaja Diamond offers diamonds in a variety of shapes, including: round, princess, emerald, square (asscher), oval, radiant, pear, heart, marquise and cushion shaped.

Lastly it is critical that you have a comprehensive understanding of diamond anatomy and proportion— brilliance, dispersion and scintillation.

Understanding how to choose the perfect diamond, will affect how you choose your engagement ring. Before choosing your perfect engagement ring, make sure you have a comprehensive understanding of diamonds- from their structure to the 4C's.

*To clarify, when we say perfect we are referring to the perfect diamond for you. This of course means that the diamond has the characteristics you desire and is within your budget. For example, some customers prefer larger diamonds with lower grades, while others prefer smaller diamonds with higher grades. Perfect diamonds— or diamonds without any flaws— are exceedingly rare and very expensive.

diamond care

Cleaning Your Diamond Jewelry

Depending on the setting you choose, you can soak your diamond engagement and/or wedding rings for up to 30 minutes in a solution of dishwashing liquid and water. This is best suited to prong and cathedral settings. In pave and basket settings, however, soaking the rings can increase the likelihood of the gems coming loose. Be mindful of this when you decide to soak any jewelry piece use mild dish soap in warm water and soak your jewelry for a few minutes. Using a soft cloth or cotton swab, gently scrub the metal (gold, platinum, silver) and then rinse. Repeat the process if necessary, but always proceed with caution when it comes to soaking jewelry.

For extra shine, you can soak diamonds in window cleaner afterwards. Because glass cleaner contains some harsh chemicals, do not soak for more than a minute at a time, and do not use this process at all with rhodium. To ensure that all of the glass cleaner is rinsed off, use the same mild dish soap solution. Dip your ring into the solution, rinse it with warm water, and then dry it completely.

You can use toothpicks to remove dirt that is lodged in between the prongs and the diamonds, but be extra careful not to scratch the metal or move the positioning of a prong. If fibers from cloth get stuck in the setting, gently use tweezers to remove them. Again, be careful of the metal. Even though diamonds can only be scratched by other diamonds, the precious metals into which they are set can be scratched more easily.

Ionic cleaners can be used on most diamond jewelry. If your engagement ring is set with stones other than diamonds, consider other cleaning methods, as some gemstones are adversely affected by the electrical current in the ionic cleaning process.

When storing your diamond jewelry, be sure to keep it separate from other jewelry. Remember that diamonds can not only scratch any other jewelry you have, but can scratch each other as well. Make sure that two diamond pieces are not being stored in such a way that they touch each other.

Insuring Your Diamond Jewelry

Once you have purchased your beautiful diamond jewelry, you will want to make sure that it is properly insured, in the event of theft or loss. Although homeowner's and renter's policies will cover a portion of your jewelry loss, it is often a small amount in comparison to the original cost of a diamond engagement ring or wedding ring. It is advisable to find out how much is covered by the policies you have in place, and then look into additional policies

If you choose to get additional insurance, find out if there is a deductible and how much it is. Most insurance companies will not insure fine jewelry without an appraisal, so make sure you find out which appraisal reports are acceptable to your insurance company. Ask if the policy covers you fully, whether the item is merely damaged, or even if it is lost overseas. Many policies will have riders that do not allow for this level of coverage. Make sure you read the details of the policy carefully before you pay for extra insurance. Also find out if your jewelry is covered at the full replacement cost, and if you can receive a cash settlement in lieu of a replacement item.

Be aware that your insurance company may require updated appraisals on a regular basis. Be prepared to have your jewelry appraised every few years. Ask what the rules are for the particular insurance company you choose. Also find out if there is a discount if you have a home security system, such as an alarm system.

When you invest in diamond jewelry, you want to make sure that your investment is protected. Research insurance companies online or call around for information to make comparisons before you choose.